Week five: It’s all about the format

This class was helpful to get the skills needed for making our interective iBook. We learned how to make videos of the screen while we work, something particularly helpful when demonstating the use of a program. We also revisited exporting notation from Sibelius as well as learning how to export audio from the program as well. Can’t wait to get started on the assignment now that I can see how to make it really exciting!

Week four: Recording and Editing

The Beatles

 

This week in Technology in Music Education, we learned how best to record and video a performance, something that would be helpful for HSC projects and for documenting progress of students.

First we recorded our song, “Hey Dude” into Garageband using condensor mics as a whole group. This audio recording went alongside three video recordings in different angles to edit together later. After we had one basic recording to use as a guide, we recorded the parts seperately with a person conducting along to a click track to make sure it stayed in time with the original recording. Once all the parts were recorded they could be edited within Garageband to they would mix well and have a better acoustic.

Though our final music-video was never actually finished, the process of creating it was invaluable for use in the classroom.

Week 3, notation

Notation
This week’s lecture was really helpful in showing me some easier ways to use Sibelius. Though I have been using Sibelius for over 6 years, I had been going about it the hard way, by clicking with the mouse or even using the arrows on th keyboard for note-entry. How much easier is it to play the music in to the program by using a piano keyboard in realtime or even note by note! Mindblown!

In the past I have been print-screening my Sibelius score then cutting it down to size on Paint in order to take out an excerpt. Now I have found the beautiful technique of grabing the music right out of the score and exporting it in to a folder! How helpful would this have been for the HSC! This is something I wil definitely keep in mind when I become a teacher and can help students make their work neater and easier to achieve.

Week one

First week of Technology in Music Education was fun, sitting around on the floor just having a chat. We talked about the place of technology in Education, something that I have been fairly against since the get-go of my music ed degree. Technology tends to be unreliable, finicky and completely over-rated.

After our little chitty-chat in class, my views have started expanding, though I must admit, I’m finding it a hard turn around.

An argument for technology in learning comes from the generational perspective. If children (the genZ, or “digital natives”) are using advanced technology at home, then why not utilise this in schools? I agree with this, as it is beneficial to use a child’s already known skills and build on them in a way that develops other skills you want them to learn.

There are the downsides to too much technology in a child’s life however, as Christakis points out in his TED talk.

http://youtu.be/BoT7qH_uVNo

Studies have shown that children who are exposed to too much fast sequenced visual stimuation have an increased risk that they will have attention difficulties when they grow up. Baby Einstein videos are designed to keep a baby’s attention focused on the on screen action. To do this, they change film clip on average every 3 seconds. When a baby is first shown these videos, their panic reflex is set off, but they DO watch the show. As they continue to watch these videos (sometimes around 4hrs a day), they become somewhat desensitised to the fast paced action. When they eventually grow up and go to school, real-life pace of learning is now too slow for the child and they become disinterested very quickly.

Before watching the video, I already had views that mirror their findings. I think it’s completely obvious that you wouldn’t plonk a baby down in front of the telly for hours on end each day, and of course, if you play with your baby with blocks and cognitive stimulation, then they will have a stronger and more well rounded development.

Mitra’s TED talk points out that children have the ability (when provided with the motivation) to learn astronomical amounts of information. He was able to come to this conclusion with the help of computers and the internet placed stategically in low-class India.

I argue that though these children had amazing learning capacities and skills from using these computers, they would already have had a basis of cognitive education from their parents at home.

Maybe the process for educating a child with technology could begin at a later age (maybe 7-8). Children will still have the motivation to learn how to use the computers and they will also have the capability to teach themselves the skill.

Home sweet home

Picton

Picton

What? Picton is a place?

Yes, as strange as it sounds, Picton is where I live. As Wikipedia teaches, Picton is “a small town in the Macarthur Region of New South Wales, Australia, in the Wollondilly Shire. The town is located [90] kilometres South-west of Sydney” and we are half an hour from pretty much everywhere; Camden, Campbelltown, Bowral and Wollongong. Talk about a central location! plus the added bonus of extra driving practise.

We are best known for our ghosts, which coincidently come out whenever there are tourists in town. Even though you may be thinking that it can’t get any better, we have more to offer. We have 3 pubs and a recent addition, a Maccas! (though that was strongly opposed by the locals)

The most recent plans for Picton is a set of traffic lights in the middle of town, our first ever. We have one roundabout and our main drag is a whopping 2 blocks long.

I will now, unashamadly, tell you of Picton’s newest claim to fame. It even tops the traffic lights. Filming took place about a year ago for Wolverine on our main street! That’s right, Hughy was here.

Hughy heading to the pub

Hughy heading to the pub in the movie

Without Hughy and the alps

Without Hughy and the alps

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For all you city slickers who still don’t understand why I live here and go to uni in town, just check out my study…

Best view from a desk

Best view from a desk